Some “new” ancient coins for the collection.

Larissa, Thessaly, Greece, Silver drachm, Larissa mint, 400-380 B.C., Rare ethnic arrangement, 5.521g, 21.8mm.  BCD Thessaly II 372.10 (same dies), SNG Delepierre 1108 (same reverse die) SNG Cop 108 ff var (ethnic arrangement) Hermann pl III, 18 var (same). O: Thessalos left restraining bull leaping left using band around bull's forehead held in both hands, he is naked but for the chlamys over shoulders, petasos with cord around his neck flying above

Larissa, Thessaly, Greece, Silver drachm, Larissa mint, 400-380 B.C., Rare ethnic arrangement, 5.521g, 21.8mm.  BCD Thessaly II 372.10 (same dies), SNG Delepierre 1108 (same reverse die) SNG Cop 108 ff var (ethnic arrangement) Hermann pl III, 18 var (same). R: Bridled horse galloping right, rein trailing, no ground line. AAP above, I horizontal below horses's head. IAE below, all within incuse square
The Greek coin from Thessaly (400-380 B.C.) is depicting ancient religious games, where the young men of Thessaly participated in bull jumping and bull wrestling. Participants would jump from a horse, naked save a chlamys and cap, to bring a bull down to the ground. The obverse shows a wrestler bringing down a bull, and the reverse shows the horse running free after the leap was made.


Trajan. Silver denarius. Rome Mint, 101-102 A.D. gVF, 3.318g, 18.0mm, 180º , RSC II 228, BMCRE III 94, BnF IV 138, Woylek 520v, RIC II 52, Strack I 41, Hunter II 30 var (aegis), SRCV II R: P M TR P COS III P P, Mars advancing right helmeted, nude but for cloak around waist, transverse spear in right hand, trophy of arms over left shouler in left hand.Trajan. Silver denarius. Rome Mint, 101-102 A.D. gVF, 3.318g, 18.0mm, 180º , RSC II 228, BMCRE III 94, BnF IV 138, Woylek 520v, RIC II 52, Strack I 41, Hunter II 30 var (aegis), SRCV II O: IMP CAES NERVA TRAJAN AVG GERM, Laureate head right Next is a coin depicting Trajan (101-102 A.D.), regarded as one of Rome’s greatest emperors. Trajan was responsible for the annexation of Dacia, the invasion of Arabia, and an extensive and lavish building program across the empire. Under Trajan, Rome reached it’s greatest extent.


Constantine The Great, Billon follis, Londinium (London) mint, 312-313 A.D. Choice EF, excellent portrait, perfect centering, slight reverse die wear, some porosity, short edge cracks, 2.338g, 21.8mm, RIC VI Londinium 279, SRCV IV 16049, Cohen VII 536 O: IMP CONSTANTINVS P F AVG, Larueate, draped and cuirassed bust right.Constantine The Great, Billon follis, Londinium (London) mint, 312-313 A.D. Choice EF, excellent portrait, perfect centering, slight reverse die wear, some porosity, short edge cracks, 2.338g, 21.8mm, RIC VI Londinium 279, SRCV IV 16049, Cohen VII 536 R: SOLI INVICTO COMITI, Sol standing slightly left, radiate, nude but for chlamys over shoulders, raising right hand commanding the sun to rise, globe in left hand, star in left field, PLN in ewcergue
Finally, a coin of Constantine the Great (312-313 A.D.). Constantine is most famous for leading the Empire to Christianity. Before the battle of Milvian Bridge, he saw “In Hoc Signo Victor Eris” (By this sign you shall conquer) on the sun around Chi Rho. With the symbol of Christ on his army’s shields, he was victorious. He moved the capital to Constantinople. The Latin word comii, during imperial times, indicated a minister of the emperor. Even the two consuls were called “comiles”. The reverse legend on the coin therefore reads: “to the unconquered Sun, minister (of Constantine).